Undergraduate Catalog 2018-19 
    
    Jul 14, 2020  
Undergraduate Catalog 2018-19 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Political Science

Other relevant courses may be found under Economics, Environmental Studies, Geography, Global Studies, and History.

  
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    POS 4810 - Internship in Political Science

    1-12 cr
    Supervised field experience in approved settings may be arranged by a written contract between the student, advisor, and Political Science coordinator. Students are expected to have adequate preparation in the discipline of Political Science. Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
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    POS 4910 - Independent Study

    1-3 cr
    Available by arrangement with the instructor and department chair. A student-faculty contract must be executed prior to registration. Signed contract required at time of registration.

Psychology

  
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    PSY 1012 - Introduction to Psychological Science

    3 cr
    A survey of a wide variety of topics studied by psychological scientists. The course objective is to introduce students to the terms, concepts and methods of psychological science.
    This course is equivalent to Introduction to Psychology; students will not receive credit for both courses.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Every semester
  
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    PSY 1030 - Psychology of Consciousness

    3 cr
    This course examines various ways that people have constructed the world in which they live. Topics will include sleep, dreams, meditation, biofeedback, hypnosis, false memories, special states of awareness, and attributional styles.
    Periodically
  
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    PSY 1050 - Human Growth and Development

    3 cr
    A survey of human developmental psychology from the prenatal period to late adulthood. The major focus is on theoretical and practical implications of developmental research for cognitive, personality and social development. Special attention will be given to interactions between maturation and experience.
    Every semester
  
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    PSY 2040 - Social Psychology

    3 cr
    Scientific study of interpersonal behavior. Topics typically discussed are attitude change and social influence, aggression and violence, impression formation, group processes, conformity and attraction.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Every semester
  
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    PSY 2110 - Educational Psychology

    3 cr
    An examination of the principles and theories of learning as they apply to the developmental changes of the child. Special emphasis will be placed on how the child learns and ways of producing optimal conditions for childhood learning.
    Every semester
  
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    PSY 2150 - Police Psychology

    3 cr
    This course introduces psychological theory and practice as it relates to specific problems of police and correctional officers. Topics covered include: crisis intervention, stress and its management, interviewing and interrogation, human relations.
    Spring
  
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    PSY 2170 - Drugs and Behavior

    3 cr
    An inquiry into the natural functioning of the brain's neurotransmitters and the impact of psychoactive drugs on mood, behavior, cognition, and perception. The major classes of recreational drugs such as stimulants, depressants, opiates, and psychedelics will be explored along with the major classes of medicinal drugs such as anti-psychotics, anti-depressants, and anxiolytics.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Fall
  
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    PSY 2210 - Applied Behavior Analysis I

    3 cr
    This is a service-learning course. As such, students will learn the content of the course while engaged in service in local schools. The course examines the principles of operant, respondent, and social learning. Emphasis is directed at the application of these principles toward classroom management, behavior change, and self-control.
    Fall
  
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    PSY 2212 - Applied Behavior Analysis II

    3 cr
    This is a service-learning course that extends the development of students’ knowledge of modern learning theory through application of this theory in local schools. Students increase understanding of course content as they provide service in the community.
    Spring
  
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    PSY 2230 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

    3 cr
    An introduction to psychology applied to work and organizations. Topics include personnel screening and selection, performance, appraisal, leadership, motivation, job satisfaction and career development.
    Periodically
  
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    PSY 2280 - Positive Psychology

    3 cr
    This course explores the meaning of work and play in people's lives from the standpoint of positive psychology. This subfield of psychology focuses on helping people understand and enhance their strengths and virtues so that they may lead fulfilling lives. Rather than the traditional psychological emphasis on mental health problems, positive psychology is about helping normal people become happier, more productive, and cultivate optimism. We explore the values people hold for work and play, while considering the challenges and rewards of "the good life."
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Fall
  
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    PSY 2810 - Internship in Psychology

    1-12 cr
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
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    PSY 2820 - Careers in Psychology

    3 cr
    A review of career options in psychology. Students will learn job hunting and resume writing skills along with approaches to choosing and applying to graduate programs in psychology. Students will be expected to realistically evaluate their interests, abilities, values, career, and life goals.
  
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    PSY 2900 - Independent Study

    1-3 cr
    Available by arrangement with department chair.
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
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    PSY 3010 - Theories of Personality

    3 cr
    Examination of individual differences in human behavior. Heavy emphasis is placed on research findings pertaining to the learning, experiential and cognitive factors contributing to personality development.
    Every semester
  
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    PSY 3040 - Cognitive Psychology

    3 cr
    Examines research on topics central to cognitive science: perception, attention, memory, thought and language. A cognitive lab will provide hands-on demonstrations of important experiments in cognitive psychology.
    Every semester
  
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    PSY 3060 - Child Psychopathology

    3 cr
    An analysis of theory, research, and therapy of psychological disorders of children, including early infantile autism, neurophysiological developmental problems, learning difficulties, developmental retardation, juvenile delinquency, and psycho-physiological disorders.
    Fall
  
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    PSY 3070 - Abnormal Psychology

    3 cr
    The description and classification of deviant behaviors. The continuity between normal and varying degrees of maladjustment is stressed.
    Every semester
  
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    PSY 3130 - Health Psychology

    3 cr
    Examination of the biopsychosocial model of health and disease. Topics will include: overviews of behavioral interventions and biofeedback, stress and stress management, pain and pain management, cancer, asthma, weight control and obesity, eating disorders and adherence to medical regimens.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Spring
  
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    PSY 3150 - Cognitive Development

    3 cr
    Examines systematic research and theory relating to issues in children’s thinking, providing critical appraisals of Piagetian and information processing approaches to perception, language, memory, intelligence and individual differences in thought due to cognitive style, experience and gender.
    Spring, odd years
  
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    PSY 3151 - Psychological Research I

    4 cr
    Introduction to the scientific method as applied to behavior. Emphasis is on the development of scientific attitudes as well as the development of the basic research skills of data collection, analysis and interpretation.  This course fulfills the Gen Ed computing requirement for Psychology majors.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1012 .
    Spring
  
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    PSY 3152 - Psychological Research II

    4 cr
    Fosters further development of scientific attitudes and research skills. Student research conducted in PSY 3151  is refined and prepared for publication. This course fulfills the Gen Ed computing requirement for Psychology majors.
    Prerequisite: PSY 3151 .
    Fall
  
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    PSY 3160 - Criminal Behavior

    3 cr
    An examination of the physiological, cognitive and learning factors involved in criminal behavior from a psychological perspective.
    Fall
  
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    PSY 3220 - Juvenile Delinquency

    3 cr
    A social systems approach to the explanation, treatment and control of delinquent behavior. Research and theory from psychology, sociology and anthropology will be emphasized.
    Spring
  
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    PSY 3240 - Social Development

    3 cr
    Examines systematic research and theory relating to issues in social and personality development, in particular: the development of conceptions of the self, achievement, aggression, altruism and moral development, sex differences and differential effects of familial and extra familial influences.
    Spring, even years
  
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    PSY 3265 - Child and Adolescent Development

    3 cr
    This course surveys the major areas of the psychology of child and adolescent development, emphasizing an understanding of the important methods, terms, theories, and findings in the field of child development.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Every semester
  
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    PSY 3410 - Biopsychology

    3 cr
    Biopsychology is the study of behavior as driven by the biology of the brain and the structure of the nervous system. Two main objectives of the course are: 1) to appreciate the complexity of sensory capabilities and abilities such as memory, judgment, coordination, and planning, and 2) to gain awareness of the spectrum of brain diseases and consequences of traumatic brain injury.
    Prerequisite:

    Every semester
  
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    PSY 3810 - Internship in Psychology

    1-12 cr
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
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    PSY 3820 - Psychology Proctorship

    3 cr
    Psychology proctors assume responsibility, under supervision, for the progress of students in psychology courses at various levels or serve as a laboratory assistant in an upper level psychology course.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the department coordinator of proctorship.
  
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    PSY 3900 - Independent Study

    1-3 cr
    Available by arrangement with department chair.
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
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    PSY 4020 - Psychological Testing

    3 cr
    Introduction to the theory, development and utility of psychological testing with emphasis on the administration and interpretation of intelligence tests.
    Prerequisite: Basic course in Statistics or consent of the instructor.
    Spring
  
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    PSY 4030 - Language and Thought

    3 cr
    An examination of the “higher” cognitive capacities of humans and other primates. Topics related to language will include speech production, speech recognition, reading and an analysis of the syntactic skills of children and chimpanzees. Topics related to thought will include planning, decision making, problem solving and reasoning.
    Fall
  
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    PSY 4050 - Nature and Nurture

    3 cr
    This course engages the student in the classic Nature versus Nurture debate in developmental psychology. Students will read classic and contemporary texts and evaluate the relative importance of genetics and environment in the development of children.
    Spring, odd years.
  
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    PSY 4060 - Psychology and Law

    3 cr
    Examines psychological theory and research as they relate to the judicial process. Topics covered include insanity, mental competence, eyewitness testimony, and jury decision making.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1012 .
    Spring
  
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    PSY 4070 - Correctional Psychology

    3 cr
    Examines the prison environment and the effectiveness of punishment, treatment and rehabilitation from a psychological perspective.
    Fall
  
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    PSY 4120 - History of Psychology

    3 cr
    This course examines the historical trends that have contributed to the growth of psychology. Emphasis is placed upon the current states of the discipline as the context for an examination of historical issues.
    Prerequisite: 9 credits in PSY courses.
    Periodically
  
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    PSY 4230 - Psychology of Rape

    3 cr
    This course examines the crime of rape from a psychological and legal perspective. Topics include: why rape occurs, becoming a survivor of rape, whether rapists can be rehabilitated, serial rapists, prison rape, male victims of rape, and legal reform.
    Fall
  
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    PSY 4320 - Advanced Research

    3 cr
    This course is designed for students who would like to conduct an intensive research project under the close supervision and guidance of the psychology faculty. Students will be responsible for data collection, analysis, interpretation, and oral presentation at a national or regional research conference.
    Spring
  
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    PSY 4421 - Psychology Practicum I

    3 cr
    In this course students will operationalize acquired skills, principles, and concepts in psychology and education. Students will function in a professional capacity in the delivery of psychological services in a public school setting under the supervision of a certified school psychologist in the state of Vermont.  Students will be involved in assessment, consultation, and intervention activities, with the primary target population being school-aged children.  Students must commit to participation over two semesters and complete both Psychology Practicum I and II.
    Prerequisite: PSY 4020  , and permission of instructor
    Fall
  
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    PSY 4422 - Psychology Practicum II

    3 cr
    This course is a continuation of Psychology Practicum I in which students operationalize acquired skills, principles, and concepts in psychology and education.  Students will function in a professional capacity in the delivery of psychological services in a public school setting under the supervision of a certified school psychologist in the state of Vermont.  Students will be involved in assessment, consultation, and intervention activities, with the primary target being school-aged children.  Students must commit to participation over two semesters and complete both Psychology Practicum I and II.
    Prerequisite: PSY 4421  and permission of the instructor
    Spring
  
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    PSY 4740 - Readings in Psychology

    3 cr
    Discussions of contemporary readings focusing on construct systems and adaptation to modern society. Representative authors include Tim O’Brien, Loren Eisley, Peter Matthiessen, Carlos Castaneda, Lynn Andrews, J.A. Swan, Jacob Bronowski and Jerome Bruner.
    Periodically
  
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    PSY 4760 - Seminar in Psychology

    3 cr
    Seminars designed to develop knowledge or skills through intensive readings, discussions, and projects in areas of psychology of special interest to a small group of students.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1012 .
  
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    PSY 4810 - Internship in Psychology

    1-12 cr
    Permission required. Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
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    PSY 4900 - Independent Study

    1-3 cr
    Available by arrangement with department chair. Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
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    PSY 4915 - Senior Thesis

    3 cr
    This course provides opportunities for advanced work on a topic of the student’s choice which will lead to a written thesis.
    Prerequisite: permission of the department chair.
  
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    PSY 4920 - Honors Thesis

    3 cr
    Involves continuing work on the honors student’s thesis.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Honors program.

Science

Other relevant courses may be found under Biology, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics. 

  
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    SCI 1050 - The Science of Food

    4 cr
    In this course students learn about the science of food and cooking.  Topics include the production, preparation and consumption of meat, bread,cheese, vegetables, fruits, spices, and beverages, such as coffee and beer.  Nutrition, metabolism, and health concerns related to each of the food classes will also be discussed.  Laboratory exercises include the preparation, analysis and consumption of various food items.
    lecture and lab
    This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Fee $20
  
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    SCI 1220 - Science and Sustainability

    3 cr
    Sustainability is a broad buzzword that seeks to redirect our view of man’s use of Earth’s resources to practices that will prolong or maintain their availability. For humans to live sustainability, the Earth’s resources must be used at a rate at which they can be replenished. However, there is now clear scientific evidence that humanity is living unsustainably, and that an unprecedented collective effort is needed to return human use of natural resources to within sustainable limits. This course explores what science has to offer as we consider mankind’s needs for energy, food and raw materials to support a growing population and nation building. Global problems will be balanced with a discussion of local issues that are key to the success of Vermont, New England and America. This course is intended for non-science majors but majors are welcome.
    Periodically
  
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    SCI 1230 - Pathways to Science

    1 cr
    Pathways to Science is a broad spectrum science course that explores a wide variety of science topics in many different areas of science.  Throughout this course students will learn skills needed to succeed in science.  The course is geared toward first year and sophomore level students by aiming to provide a solid base of science terminology and principles.  Pathways to Science is an introduction in how to succeed in science, how to initiate a research project, and how to get through the first two years of a science program.  Students will identify future goals, career objectives, and put together a plan for graduation.
    Biology, Ecological Studies, Environmental Science, and Geology majors.
    Pass/No pass only.
    Spring
  
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    SCI 2100 - Science Colloquium

    1 cr
    Visiting scientists, department faculty, Castleton students, and scientists in the workforce will give presentations about current scientific research and careers in science.  Students are given an opportunity to interact with the invited speakers and strengthen their personal scientific network.  This science research seminar is open to any Natural Sciences major or minor (BIO, CHE, EXS, GEY, HLT, ENV) and is meant to introduce students to a wide range of current research areas and potential careers in science.  This course is repeatable for credit.
    Pass/No pass only.
    Prerequisite: Students enrolled in a major or minor offered by the Natural Sciences Department or permission of the instructor.
    Fall
  
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    SCI 2210 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    3 or 4 cr
    (also listed as GEO 2210 )
    This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of modern geographic information systems (GIS). The class will consist of lectures, discussions, readings, demonstrations, and hands-on training exercises using ESRI's GIS software. This will give students experience in defining spatial problems and solutions, organizing and locating geographic data, manipulating data for display, and map creation and use of a desktop GIS. Students will be expected to use what they have learned to develop a final GIS project.  This course fulfills the Gen Ed computing requirement at the Bachelor's level.
    Lab fee $40.
    Spring, even years

Sociology

Other relevant courses may be found under Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Geography, Psychology, and Social Work.

  
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    SOC 1010 - Introduction to Sociology

    3 cr
    A systematic introduction to the study of social behavior and social organization. The major conceptual tools of sociology are used to explore the structure, processes, and content of social action; to provide insight into the regularity and diversity of human social behavior.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Every semester
  
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    SOC 1030 - Social Problems

    3 cr
    An examination of such problems as population, pollution, poverty, crime, and racism as they exist in contemporary American society.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Every semester
  
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    SOC 2040 - Race, Ethnicity, Class and Gender

    3 cr
    An exploration of the historical and contemporary roots for discrimination (especially on the institutional level) on the basis of race, ethnicity, class, and gender. This course examines issues such as culture, identity, and oppression.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010  or consent of instructor.
    Every semester
  
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    SOC 2080 - Thinking Bodies

    3 cr
    Crosslisted as WGS 2080   
    An interdisciplinary study of the ways in which society thinks about bodies in relation to social locations.  Students examine the various ways in which bodies are socially constructed, disciplined, and assigned meanings based on race, class, gender, sexuality, nationality, age, and disability.  This course encourages students to consider experiences of embodiment from sociological and feminist perspectives.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Periodically
  
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    SOC 2130 - The Community in American Society

    3 cr
    Examination of the structure and functions of the community within the framework of the rural-urban continuum. Critical analysis of representative institutions, formal and informal associations, and the impact of change on community organizations.
    Fall
  
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    SOC 2170 - Gender Studies

    3 cr
    This course will provide an examination of the ways in which gender affects the personal and social experiences of women and men. Some of the topics to be addressed are historical perspectives, gender socialization, interpersonal relationships, sexuality and sexual orientation, power dynamics, and the roles performed by women and men in major social institutions.
    Fall
  
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    SOC 2210 - Deviant Behavior

    3 cr
    An examination of theories of etiology and distribution of deviant behavior.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010  or consent of instructor.
    Spring
  
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    SOC 2230 - Death And Dying

    3 cr
    An examination of death and dying from the cross-cultural, social, historical, familial and personal perspectives.  An emphasis is given to the cultural beliefs and behaviors and the social approaches of understanding and coping with death and dying.
    Periodically
  
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    SOC 2240 - The Changing Family

    3 cr
    The changing structure and functions of the American Family are analyzed from a variety of different perspectives including premarital and marital roles, parent-child interaction, and the termination of the marital relationship.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010  or consent of instructor.
    Spring
  
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    SOC 2250 - Public Policy

    3 cr
    This course is intended to give undergraduate students an in-depth look at Sociology and Public Health as related disciplines with intersecting perspectives. We will explore a variety of topics including: foundational theories of public health, health care and education reform, knowledge about and access to public assistance, early teen and adolescent sexual health, community and neighborhood impacts on individual health, and climate change and health. This course will investigate how we can work together to understand the general condition of our social institutions, their impact on those living in the United States, and the implementation of important programs and policies. We will explore the interconnected relationship between institutions in the United States, policy, and individuals' lives, and incorporate the current social discussions around health, and health care. By the end of the semester you will have a better understanding of the important role that major institutions play in the general health of those living in the US.
    Periodically
  
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    SOC 2260 - Demographics and Diversity

    3 cr
    This course will identify the major demographic trends in the United States. The course will utilize a demographic perspective to examine the following issues: birth rates/pregnancy rates, resegregation in public schools, school drop out rates/graduation rates, prison population/recidivism rates, divorce, poverty, access to healthcare, life expectancy, Social Security, Medicare/Medicaid, and long-term care.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010 , ANT 1010   or consent of instructor.
    Spring
  
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    SOC 2350 - Poverty and Public Policy

    3 cr
    This course explores the trends of poverty in the United States. It discusses national, state, and community level rates, as well as the causes, consequences, and costs for those living in poor communities. Specifically, the class examines how these trends differ based on income, race, and location. It also covers the economic and social policies related to poverty and inequality, critically analyzing the impact on perpetuating poverty levels across the United States.
    Periodically
  
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    SOC 2450 - Sociology of Mental Health


    Mental health is more than just a biological or genetic issue. Our society plays a significant role in the emotional and mental health of our citizens. This course explores the social impacts on mental health. It discusses how our society thinks, defines, and reacts to mental health issues, including our social stigma related to diagnoses and treatment, and the course investigates how and why access to resources differs by race/ethnicity, gender, and social class. Finally, the course examines our country's policies related to mental health, and what we can do to help improve those policies and our communities.
    Periodically
  
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    SOC 2710 - Selected Topics in Sociology

    3 cr
    Specialized study in Sociology with specific topics to be announced prior to each semester. Course offerings will be determined by student demand and faculty availability. Specific topics may include: countercultures, globalization, business, the military, construction of the other, oral history, qualitative methods.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010 .
    Periodically
  
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    SOC 2900 - Independent Study

    1-3 cr
    Available by arrangement with coordinator.
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
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    SOC 3070 - Medical Sociology

    3 cr
    A critical analysis of health, illness, and mental health, environmental and occupational health care systems, the health care work force, social movements, and social change in the field of health and mental health care.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010  or consent of instructor.
    Periodically
  
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    SOC 3120 - Sociology of Education

    3 cr
    This course explores the ways in which the educational system reproduces social class through such means as tracking in schools, unequal distribution of funding for schools, and the favoring of certain groups in the classroom and educational system on the basis of such factors as race, ethnicity, and gender.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010  or consent of instructor.
    Spring
  
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    SOC 3140 - Sociology of Popular Music

    3 cr
    A sociological analysis of the origins, evolution, and place of popular music forms in modern societies, with emphasis on the American experience. Special attention is paid to the dynamic interplay between popular cultural (emergent) and mass cultural (commodified) forms of music—especially soul, jazz, rhythm and blues, rock, punk, reggae, and rap—as well as the social conditions and subcultures from which such music arises.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010  or consent of instructor.
    Periodically
  
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    SOC 3150 - Sport And Society

    3 cr
    An examination of current issues in the sociology of sport, focusing on how the institution of sport is a microcosm of society and how it provides insights into a society's national psyche, economic, and political systems, social problems, international relations, and issues of social change. Applying the theories and methods of sociology to the analysis of sport, the course examines the relationship between sport, culture, and society.
    Periodically
  
  •  

    SOC 3160 - Anthropology of Religion

    3 cr
    This course offers a cross cultural and sociological examination of the function, meaning, and evolutionary significance of religious symbols and practices in human societies. An examination of the origin and evolution of spiritual or supernatural cultures- including animism, magic, witchcraft, myth, and theism- will provide a historical and cross cultural perspective on the varieties of religious experience.
    Periodically
  
  •  

    SOC 3210 - Criminology

    3 cr
    An interdisciplinary study of the causes of crime and criminal behavior, with particular emphasis on sociological perspectives. Classical through contemporary criminological theories will be examined, as well as patterns and varieties of crime.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010  or consent of instructor.
    Spring
  
  •  

    SOC 3220 - Social Movements of The 1960’s

    3 cr
    A study of the significant social movements of this decade of rapid social change. Analysis will be made of how social movements such as civil rights and the Anti-war movement drew upon cultural, intellectual and political currents of the time. SOC 1010  or consent of instructor.
    Fall
  
  •  

    SOC 3410 - Dismantling Rape Culture

    3 cr
    This course makes the case that there is a structured precarity that all women face when it comes to the crime of rape. This means that the way society is structured historically, politically, legally and socially makes all women vulnerable to rape. The course will explore how rape culture makes all women vulnerable to rape, but also how this vulnerability is exacerbated by race, class and gender non-conformity. The course will also examine the problematic construction of masculinity in the US and how this notion of masculinity contributes to rape culture and limits men's freedom of expression. The course makes the case that we all benefit by dismantling rape culture.
    Periodically
  
  •  

    SOC 3610 - Seminar in Advocacy

    4 cr
    Students taking this course are trained to be peer advocates for the CHANGE Initiative (Creating, Honoring, Advocating and Nurturing Gender Equity).  Students will attend a weekend long training to learn how to advocate for survivors of sexual assault, relationship violence, stalking, and harassment as well as attending weekly classes. Students are required to staff the PAC phone line and will do programming to change campus culture and decrease problems mentioned above.
    Prerequisite: Application and permission of the instructor.
    Fall
  
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    SOC 3720 - Special Topics in Activism, Advocacy and Social Change

    3 cr
    This course makes in depth analysis of activism, advocacy and social change. The central focus of this course is to explore the importance of activism and advocacy to promote social change. An exact course description will be provided to the registrar prior to registration.
    Repeatable twice for credit.
    Periodically
  
  •  

    SOC 3810 - Internship in Sociology

    1-12 cr
    An opportunity for the student to take a position of responsibility in a professional environment under the direction of an on-site supervisor and a faculty member. Not more than 6 credits may be counted toward the 31 credit sociology major.
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the coordinator.
  
  •  

    SOC 3820 - Sociology Proctorship

    3 cr
    Sociology proctors assume responsibility, under faculty supervision, for the progress of students in Sociology courses at various levels or serve as laboratory assistants in SOC 3910 . May not be taken more than twice for credit.
    Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    SOC 3910 - Research Methods

    4 cr
    Introduction to the basic methods of sociological research design, data collection, the organization and analysis of data, and their interpretation through an actual research project. This course fulfills the Gen Ed computing requirement for Sociology majors.
    Prerequisite: Junior majors in SOC, CRJ or acceptance in Social Work program, or consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    SOC 4020 - Sociological Theory

    3 cr
    Critical analysis of the development of sociological thought from Comte to the present, with particular emphasis on the theoretical contributions which have been instrumental in the emergence of sociology as and academic discipline.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010 or consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    SOC 4620 - Seminar in Public Sociology

    3 cr
    Students taking this course will do the work of a "public sociologist." This could include working for a non-profit agency, interning at the Statehouse, or performing research for social service agencies. This course will demonstrate to students the real world applications of doing sociology.  
    Periodically
  
  •  

    SOC 4720 - Capstone Seminar and Careers in Sociology

    3 cr
    A culminating seminar for Sociology majors to demonstrate an understanding of the field of sociology, the methods of sociological research, and investigate careers and graduate school opportunities in Sociology and related fields.
    Prerequisite: SOC 3910  and SOC 4020 .
  
  •  

    SOC 4810 - Internship in Sociology

    1-12 cr
    An opportunity for the student to take a position of responsibility in a professional environment under the direction of an on-site supervisor and a faculty member. Not more than 6 credits may be counted toward the 31 credit sociology major.
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
    Prerequisite: Permission of the coordinator.
  
  •  

    SOC 4910 - Independent Study

    1-3 cr
    Available by arrangement with coordinator.
    Signed contract required at time of registration.

Social Work

Other relevant courses may be found under Sociology.

  
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    SWK 1010 - Introduction to Human Services

    3 cr
    An overview of the organization, values, theories and variety of activities of various human service professions, with specific emphasis on Social Work. Designed to acquaint students with the range of human services and to test interest in a helping career. Social work majors must get a C or better to continue on with social work required courses.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
  
  •  

    SWK 1810 - Early Field

    1 cr
    Pre-professional helping experience in local Social Service Program. NOTE: Students with prior human services experience may be exempted from this requirement. See Instructor.
    Prerequisite: SWK 1010 , or taken concurrently with SWK 1010 .
    Every Semester
  
  •  

    SWK 2011 - Human Behavior In The Social Environment I

    3 cr
    An examination of the life cycle from a perspective of systems analysis. Studies conception to adolescence focusing on the interrelationships among physiological, psychological, social and cultural systems. Specific emphasis is on the social institutions that affect movement of the individual through the life cycle.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010 , PSY 1012 BIO 1010  or BIO 2011  prerequisite or concurrent, or permission of the instructor.
    Fall
  
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    SWK 2012 - Human Behavior In The Social Environment II

    3 cr
    A continuation of SWK 2011  covering the stages of the life cycle from adolescence through death. In addition, an understanding of the behavioral dynamics of large systems is developed and applied to practical situations.
    Prerequisite: SWK 2011  or consent of instructor.
    Spring
  
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    SWK 2020 - Family Violence

    3 cr
    Analyzes the psychosocial dynamics of families disrupted by domestic violence. Aspects of child abuse, spouse abuse and elder abuse will be covered. Differential social work assessment and intervention will be emphasized.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Every Semester
  
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    SWK 2030 - Human Sexuality

    3 cr
    An explanation of contemporary issues, theories and practices from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will analyze videos and a range of written content with respect to sexual messages and behavior. Aspects of sexual obstacles and conflicts with appropriate modes of intervention will also be highlighted.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Fall
  
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    SWK 2040 - Discrimination in American Society

    3 cr
    An understanding of the dynamics and American history of prejudice and discrimination in relation to racial and ethnic minorities, women and the aged is developed. Special emphasis placed on issues relevant to Social Welfare.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010  or consent of instructor.
    Spring
  
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    SWK 2050 - Intervention with Families and Children

    3 cr
    An introduction to basic strategies and interventions used to help families and children cope with psychosocial/environmental needs, difficulties and problems. Problem areas include child abandonment, sexual and physical abuse, learning difficulties, marital discord, dysfunctional communication, and gang membership. Emphasis is placed upon research and practice outcomes in child welfare settings.
    Prerequisite: SWK 1010 , or SOC 1010 , or PSY 1012 , or consent of instructor.
    Fall
  
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    SWK 2130 - Introduction to the Study of Aging

    3 cr
    A critical theoretical approach to the study of aging. A life span developmental perspective will frame issues on aging. Students will gain an understanding of the sociological, psychological, biological, and political aspects of aging. Application of knowledge for helping professionals will be emphasized through an interdisciplinary framework.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Fall
  
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    SWK 2140 - Substance Abuse and Addiction Studies

    3 cr
    This course is an exploration of the biopsychosocial issues surrounding substance use, abuse, and addiction, including behavioral addictions such as gambling, gaming, rage, etc.  Students will explore current pharmacological, behavioral, and social treatment options for behavioral addiction and substance use disorders.  Costs of addiction will be assessed, including economic, legal, individual, family, and health care.  Students will review screening tools currently being used in the field to better understand the signs and symptoms of addiction, including the DSM-V diagnostic criteria.  Addiction recovery policies, laws, and ethics will be analyzed, with a focus on prevention, treatment, and community supports for youth, families, and adults.
    This course fulfills the Social and Behavioral Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Fall
  
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    SWK 2710 - Selected Topics in Social Work

    3 cr
    Specific topics to be announced in the Semester Course Offerings. Course offerings will be determined by student interest and availability of faculty. Specific topics may include: Community Organization, Social Work with Groups, Social Work with the Elderly, Developmental Disabilities, Psychosocial Aspects of AIDS, Rural Social Work, Social Work in Health Care Settings, Radical Social Work, and Child Welfare. No topic may be taken more than once for credit.
  
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    SWK 2900 - Independent Study

    1-3 cr
    Available by arrangement with coordinator.
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
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    SWK 3010 - Social Work Practice I

    3 cr
    The process of social work intervention, including professional values and roles and the development of practice skills. Required of students in the Social Work Program.
    Prerequisite: SWK 1810  and SWK 2011 , or consent of instructor
    Co-requisite: SWK 3020  
    Spring
  
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    SWK 3020 - History And Philosophy Of Social Work

    3 cr
    Provides a theoretical model of professionalization for analyzing social work’s historical development. Examines how social work moved from its original altruism to become identified with case work rather than social reform. A critical review of issues central to social policy and social services.
    Prerequisite: SOC 1010 , SWK 1010 , SWK 2011 ; taken concurrently with SWK 3010  except with consent of instructor.
    Spring
 

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