Undergraduate Catalog 2018-19 
    
    Oct 21, 2020  
Undergraduate Catalog 2018-19 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Global Studies

Other relevant courses may be found under Economics, Environmental Studies, Geography, History, and Political Science.

  
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    GLB 2030 - Coffee and the World

    3 cr
    This course uses a familiar commodity - coffee - as a lens through which to examine the relationship between the familiar goods we consume and what it takes to deliver them to us. Coffee is the second-most traded good in the world (after oil) and its production, trade, and consumption affect millions of people. Despite this, most people know very little about it. What they do know is focused almost entirely on consumption of the final product. Throughout the semester, we will draw back the curtain on coffee to learn how our local choices affect the world.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Offered periodically
  
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    GLB 3810 - Cultural Immersion Experience

    0-2 cr
    Study, work, intern, or volunteer abroad for 15 weeks in an approved cultural immersion experience. Not mere tourism, this requires students to make genuine efforts to engage with the society and culture of their host country. Students work closely with a Cultural Immersion Mentor to plan, carry out, and reflect on their activities abroad to gain meaningful insights that allow them to act knowledgeably and effectively as participants in that country and others. The student is responsible for arranging funding for the semester abroad.
    Prerequisite: Complete the 6 core GLB courses; 6 credits or equivalent in foreign language; 9 credits in the GLB thematic and/or regional concentrations; and a Cultural Immersion Contract (obtained from the Global Studies Coordinator).
    Every semester
  
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    GLB 4610 - Global Studies Capstone Seminar

    3 cr
    This collaborative seminar is required of all students majoring in Global Studies. Students work together, discussing common readings, lectures and films that investigate a variety of concepts and issues to advance their understanding of the globalized world and their place in it. They critically analyze and evaluate the knowledge and perspectives they gained in their Global Studies coursework and cultural immersion abroad. Students then present their unique analysis and synthesis of their global education in a culminating research project. Emphasis is on systematically developing their own complex and mature world view, including their own global career path.
    Prerequisite: GLB 3810 .
    Spring

Health Education

  
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    HED 2310 - Health Education Methods

    3 cr
    This course examines comprehensive school health education and the research and theory of health behavior. Course content includes the following: the historical development and philosophy of health education; knowledge of health education concepts and skills delineated in current national and Vermont health education standards, laws and regulations; the impact of societal values, norms and priorities on health education practice; the process of selecting and using current, valid and reliable sources of health information, to include national, state, and local organizations/associations, publications and educational materials/resources; and analyzing research relative to health risks among school-age youth and translating research into recommendations for the design and implementation of health education programs. This course also explores the purposes, components and approaches to coordinating school health initiatives based on the national Coordinated School Health model, including partnerships with families, school staff, and community members to improve health literacy and health behaviors.
    Prerequisite: PED 2420 , or permission of the instructor.
    Spring
  
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    HED 3010 - Elementary Health Education Curriculum & Assessment

    3 cr
    This course examines elementary standards-based Health Education curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Students explore the process of planning an effective, age-appropriate school health curriculum that aligns with the Vermont Health Education standards including developmentally appropriate instructional strategies and uses multiple assessment techniques. Students also learn about applying diverse innovative instructional strategies that align with standards-based learner outcomes and performance indicators; implementing skill building strategies to develop competency in health related skills; and selecting, designing and utilizing multiple assessment techniques. The process of Health Education program evaluation is also be discussed.
    Prerequisite: PED 2420 , HED 2310  (Health Education Methods), or permission of the Instructor.
    Fall
  
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    HED 3020 - Secondary Health Education Curriculum & Assessment

    3 cr
    This course examines secondary standards-based Health Education curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Students explore the process of planning an effective, age-appropriate school health curriculum that aligns with the Vermont Health Education standards including developmentally appropriate instructional strategies and uses multiple assessment techniques. Students also learn about applying diverse innovative instructional strategies that align with standards-based learner outcomes and performance indicators; implementing skill building strategies to develop competency in health related skills; and selecting, designing and utilizing multiple assessment techniques. The process of Health Education program evaluation is also be discussed
    Prerequisite: PED 2420 . HED 2310  (Health Education methods), or permission of the Instructor.
    Spring
  
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    HED 3051 - Health and Physical Activity Promotion I

    3 cr
    This course deals with the analysis of principles of program planning in health and physical activity promotion.  Topics include:  needs assessment, community analysis and organization, program planning and selection, program implementation and coordination, and program evaluation.
    Prerequisite: HED 2310  or PED 2410  or permission of instructor
  
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    HED 4052 - Health and Physical Activity Promotion II

    3 cr
    This course builds off the knowledge and skill base in HED 3051  Health and Physical Activity Promotion I.  Additional topics include: administration and management of health and physical activity promotion programs, serving as a health and physical activity resource person, and communication and advocacy for health and physical activity promotion.
    Prerequisite: HED 3051  with a grade of C or better
  
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    HED 4510 - Seminar in Teaching Health Education

    1 cr
    This seminar prepares the student for the student teaching experience, supports the student during the experience, and introduces or reviews competencies associated with the role of the professional educator. Preparation of the teacher licensure portfolio is emphasized.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance to Health Student Teaching
    Co-requisite: HED 4801  and HED 4802 
    Every semester
  
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    HED 4801 - Directed Student Teaching in Health Education I

    6 cr
    This course is an opportunity for the student to teach under the guidance of a qualified cooperating teacher and university supervisor. Students seeking teacher licensure in preK-12 Health Education must apply, qualify, and be admitted to student teaching.
    Prerequisite: Complete all required major courses, meet required GPA standard, departmental recommendation, and professional and related intellectual competencies as stated in written application requirements.
    Co-requisite: HED 4802  and HED 4510  
    Every semester
  
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    HED 4802 - Directed Student Teaching in Health Education II

    6 cr
    This course is an opportunity for the student to teach under the guidance of a qualified cooperating teacher and university supervisor. Students seeking teacher licensure in K-12 Health Education must apply, qualify, and be admitted to student teaching.
    Prerequisite: Complete all required major courses, meet required GPA standard, departmental recommendation, and professional and related intellectual competencies as stated in written application requirements.
    Co-requisite: HED 4801  and HED 4510  
  
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    HED 4810 - Internship in Health and Physical Activity Promotion

    3-12 cr
    The Internship in Health and Physical Activity Promotion is designed to be a capstone experience that provides students with an opportunity to utilize their knowledge and skills working in the field. 
    Prerequisite: HED 4052   with a grade of "C" or better and permission of the PED Department Chair
  
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    HED 4811 - Elementary Health Education Practicum

    1-2 cr
    Sixty hours (or more) of supervised health education field experience in the elementary (PK-6) setting.
    Prerequisite: HED 3010 - Elementary Health Education Curriculum & Assessment , departmental recommendation, or permission of the instructor.
    Every semester
  
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    HED 4812 - Secondary Health Education Practicum

    1-2 cr
    Sixty hours (or more) of supervised health education field experience in the middle/secondary (7-12) setting.
    Prerequisite: HED 3020 - Secondary Health Education Curriculum & Assessment , departmental recommendation, or permission of the instructor.
    Every semester

History

Other relevant courses may be found under Economics, Environmental Studies, Geography, Global Studies, and Political Science.

  
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    HIS 1010 - Roots: Historical Perspectives on Global Problems and Issues

    3 cr
    This course explores the historical roots of current global problems and issues such as terrorism, religious fundamentalism, environmental degradation, species extinction, racism, genocide, global warming, new technology, famine, AIDS, unemployment, war, poverty, disease, and other human rights issues. Both recent and more distant historical factors will be studied in order to understand why these problems exist, how they may be changing, and what an informed citizen can do to help alleviate them. Students will 1) read and discuss a variety of news and other sources of information, interpretations, and commentaries; 2) examine the uses and abuses of historical analysis; and 3) demonstrate, in a culminating individual project, how historical perspective and analysis can suggest causes of, and humane remedies for, a particular global problem or issue. This course will, whenever possible, incorporate service-learning components in order to help students and faculty meet the goals of the course.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Every semester
  
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    HIS 1125 - The Ancient World

    3 cr
    This course explores continuity, change, connections and comparisons within and between societies that developed in different regions of the world before the rise of Islam in the 7th century.  We examine the historical texts and contexts in which humans communicated, complained, dreamed, prayed and made meaning of their lives in worlds that were very different from, and yet surprisingly similar to, our own.
    Fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Every semester
  
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    HIS 1135 - Global History

    3 cr
    This course introduces students to the discipline of history in general and to the field of global history in particular.  It examines the roots and expansion of globalization - broadly defined as the growing interconnectedness of our world - from the rise of Islam to the 21st century.
    Fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Every semester
  
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    HIS 1215 - Survey of Early U.S. History

    3 cr
    The European colonization of the Americas and the subsequent emergence of the United States held tremendous consequences for the peoples of the modern world.  Colonial regimes set in motion a chain of events that destroyed unique Native American cultures, and the demands of merchants and planters in the Americas fueled the African slave trade, one of the largest forced migrations in human history.  At the same time, political elites and ordinary people participated in a transatlantic Age of Revolutions that introduced to the world new ways of organizing government and thinking about human rights.  Students in this introductory survey course will study these foundations of national life in the United States.  The topics to be considered include Native American cultures and colonialism; slavery and its destruction; the role of race and gender relations in American life; and the emergence of liberalism and nationalism in the modern world.
    Fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Every semester
  
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    HIS 1225 - Survey of Modern U.S. History

    3 cr
    The emergence of the United States as a global power represents one of the most significant developments in recent world history.  This introductory survey course will trace America's growing engagement with the world over the course of the long twentieth century.  At the same time, the course will consider the development domestically of a modern centralized state that has increasingly concerned itself with the rights and well-being of individual citizens.  Topics will include industrialization and its critics, imperialism, the two World Wars, the development of a social safety net, movements for civil rights and social justice for women and minorities, and the origins of America's engagement with the Middle East.
    Fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Every semester
  
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    HIS 2020 - History of Ireland

    3 cr
    This course is a survey of the history of the island from its earliest settlement, through foreign invasions and conquest, to its divided
    present.  Invasions, imperialism, ethnic and religious conflict, bigotry, and economic exploitation have all featured in this history.
    At the same time, Irish culture and society are among the most vibrant and vital in the world.  Through an exploration of key primary and
    secondary sources in lecture and discussion we will see how the triumphs and tragedies of Irish history have shaped this island and its peoples.
    This course satisfies the World Views frame of reference.
    Periodically
  
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    HIS 2070 - Vermont History

    3 cr
    Vermont has a long history of interaction between Abenaki and Mohawk, French and English, New England and New York. This course examines economic, political, cultural, and environmental themes in the history of Vermont with a special focus on what makes this region unique.
    Fall
  
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    HIS 2210 - History of Women in the U.S.

    3 cr
    This course is a study of women's history.  Using the United States as an example, this class will explore the roles that women have played historically and seek to question traditional narratives of history, in which women are often marginalized.  What might colonialism, the Revolutionary War, slavery, the Industrial Revolution, the Civil War, the Great Depression or the Civil Rights Movement look like through women's eyes?
    This course satisfies the World Views frame of reference.
    Spring, odd years
  
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    HIS 2255 - Medieval and Early Modern Europe

    3 cr
    This course examines European history from the medieval period through the French Revolution. We survey the major events of this period, such as the Crusades, the Renaissance, the Reformation, the "Age of Exploration," and the Enlightenment, while also paying particular attention to the cultural, intellectual, and social developments that accompanied these events. While this course is primarily concerned with European history, we also consider this history in a global context throughout the semester.
    Fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Periodically
  
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    HIS 2260 - Asia in the World

    3 cr
    Contemporary discussions of globalization often lack historical and regional perspective. This course provides just that: an examination of the economic, religious, diplomatic, military and cultural relationships among and between Asians and the rest of the world from ca. 600 to the present time. Focus on India, China, Japan, Vietnam, Indonesia, the Philippines and Pakistan. We will address imperial domination and revolutionary resistance, economic and ethnic nationalism, current dynamics, and the role of historical memory, as in the legacy of World War II.
    Spring
  
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    HIS 2285 - Modern Europe

    3 cr
    This course examines European history from the French Revolution to the collapse of the Soviet Union. The class surveys the critical events of the period, including the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, the two world wars, and the Cold War. We focus particularly on the rapid cultural, economic, political, and social transformations of Europe in the last two centuries, the projection of European power around the world, and the response to European imperialism both inside and outside of Europe.
    Periodically
  
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    HIS 2335 - Asia through Food and Film

    3 cr
    This course uses food and film to teach about cultural experiences of Asians and their historical relationships to the lands and to the peoples they encountered through migration, trade and conquest. Its basic goal will be to stimulate students’ thinking and enthusiasm for learning more about Asia, but it also aims to challenge them to consider how culture, environment, economics, and politics intersect in the foods people eat, and how historical change and continuity reflect and reverberate in that intersection. A multisensory understanding of Asian culture and history is gained through readings, films, class lecture and discussion, and cooking and eating a variety of Asian foods. Fees: $25 for cooking ingredients, restaurant items, and honoraria for guest gourmets to give presentations and cooking demonstrations.
    Fall
  
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    HIS 2410 - History and Culture of Latin America

    3 cr
    The pre-Columbian Indian cultures of the New World; the Spanish and Portuguese conquest and colonial empires; the political and cultural divergence that followed independence; the economic and social problems of the Latin American republics and the course of their relations with the United States.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Spring, odd years
  
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    HIS 2431 - African History Before 1885

    3 cr
    An introduction to the richness of African history before its wholesale colonization by Europeans. This course explores societies across the continent, including ancient Egypt, Nubia, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Kongo, Zimbabwe, the Zulu kingdom, and the trading city states of the Swahili coast, as well as smaller stateless societies. We explore the role of long-distance trade in shaping the political, economic, social and cultural history of African societies, including the trans-Saharan, Indian Ocean and transatlantic trade. The course begins with ancient Egypt and ends with the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade, and the beginnings of European colonization.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Fall
  
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    HIS 2432 - African History After 1885

    3 cr
    After 1885, European colonization changed the political map and history of Africa; postcolonial governments continue to struggle with this and other legacies of colonialism, while facing new challenges. Using documentary and feature film, novels, memoirs and scholarly texts, this course provides an introduction to the history of colonial and post-colonial Africa.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Spring
  
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    HIS 2810 - Internship in History

    3 cr
    By arrangement with the coordinator of the history program. See Internships . Signed contract required at time of registration. Variable credit.
  
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    HIS 2910 - Independent Study

    3 cr
    Provides the exceptionally curious and motivated student the opportunity to explore on an introductory level an aspect of historical study that is not offered by the courses listed in the university catalog. Students need to arrange with an appropriate history faculty member a student-faculty independent study contract prior to registration.
    Every semester
  
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    HIS 3130 - The Civil War and Reconstruction

    3 cr
    The Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction represents one of the most important periods in US history. Four million African Americans gained freedom from bondage, 600,000 soldiers perished in the nation’s bloodiest war, and the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments to the constitution redefined the nature of American citizenship. This upper-division course will explore the war and its aftermath by discussing the period’s most important themes, reading the work of distinguished authors, and examining documents left by participants. Topics for consideration will include the ebb and flow of military campaigns, the northern and southern home fronts, the politics of war and peace, and the impact of the war on black and white Americans in the North and in the South.
    Spring, odd years
  
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    HIS 3210 - Social History of Latin America

    3 cr
    This course is designed to explore various issues in the social history of Latin America. Topics will include race and ethnic relations, labor, gender, rural society, and class as presented in the journal literature, therefore reflecting much of the latest research on these topics.
    Periodically
  
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    HIS 3220 - Revolutions in Latin America

    3 cr
    This course examines the role revolutionary violence played in establishing a modern Atlantic world based on the idea of the liberal nation-state. We will take as our guiding assumption that liberation movements in Latin America played a key role in that process, but we will at times consider the critical influence of revolutions in North America and Europe on events in Latin America. We will especially consider the roles of nationalism, Marxism, and anti-colonialism in providing models for revolutionary violence.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Periodically
  
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    HIS 3340 - Europe and the Middle East

    3 cr
    Since ancient times, Europe and the Middle East have had a shared history, a history marked by both conflict and cooperation. This course explores European perceptions of - as well as conflicts and encounters with - the Middle East since the rise of Islam in the seventh century. We examine the political, military, economic, social, and cultural interactions between the two regions as well as the roots of contemporary problems.
    Periodically
  
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    HIS 3345 - Masculinities in Modern Europe

    3 cr
    This course examines the many meanings and practices of masculinity in Europe since the French Revolution. Starting with the assumption that ideas about masculinity are culturally constructed, we explore the relationship of masculinities to nationalism, imperialism, work, sexuality, war, politics, and other important elements of modern European history. The role of masculinities in justifying and perpetuating, and at times undermining, systems of power based on race, gender, and sexuality are central to our analysis.
    Periodically
  
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    HIS 3365 - The British Empire

    3 cr
    This course will examine the rise and fall of the British Empire, from its origins in Ireland to its decline and (with a few exceptions) fall in the twentieth century.  Topics covered include migration, slavery, commerce and trade, anti-colonial nationalism, and ideas of race and gender.
    Periodically
  
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    HIS 3450 - Women in European History

    3 cr
    A study of the changing role of women in European history is offered from the end of antiquity to the 20th century. Topics include women in public and private life, the economic and legal position of women, and the changing role of women in society.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Periodically
  
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    HIS 3475 - Women and Gender in African History

    3 cr
    This course examines the changing roles of both women and gender in African history, from precolonial through postcolonial societies. Using case studies from different eras and regions, the course explores political, social and economic change, and includes a discussion of sexualities and of African feminist critiques of western feminism.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Spring
  
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    HIS 3480 - Special Topics: Africa in Global History

    3 cr
    This seminar explores selected advanced topics, ranging from ancient to contemporary African history. The specific topic and course description will be announced prior to each registration period, but each course will examine both primary and secondary sources and will explore African history in the context of global connections and comparisons. This course may be repeated for credit as topics change.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Fall
  
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    HIS 3510 - Chinese History and Culture

    3 cr
    An introductory survey of Chinese history and culture from early China to today. Topics will include images of China in the West; art, language, literature, and beliefs; the evolution of traditional social roles and identities; the rise of the imperial state and problems of empire; Western imperialism; major movements for reform and revolution; the status of women; the cultural revolution; democracy and the roles of intellectuals and artists; and China's international interests today and over time.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Fall
  
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    HIS 3520 - Japanese History and Culture

    3 cr
    An introductory survey of Japanese culture and history from ancient times to today, including the foundations and evolution of the Japanese state; the role of Shinto, Buddhism and other belief systems in society and politics; the significance of Chinese influence; rise of the samurai and the philosophy of bushido; the "floating world" of urban Japanese culture; imperial restoration and problems of empire; WWII and the U.S. occupation; and economic competitiveness and Japan's international interests.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Spring
  
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    HIS 3570 - History, Memory and War

    3 cr
    This course focuses on three of America’s wars with Asia (World War II in the Pacific; the Korean War, and the Vietnam War), and provides an opportunity for each student to undertake a research project on a war of his or her choosing. The course takes a cultural and comparative approach to history and memory. We examine the public history controversies surrounding the representation and interpretation of wars, and we analyze the social, political, and personal interplay of history, collective memory, and national consciousness by comparing Asian, European, and American experiences.
    Spring 2015, Spring 2018
  
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    HIS 3610 - History Proctorship

    1-3 cr
    History proctors assume partial responsibility, under faculty supervision, for the progress of students in a History course. Sample duties include conducting study sessions, preparing handouts, leading discussion groups, and tutoring individual students. May be taken more than once (but no more than 3 credits may count toward the major).
    Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.
  
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    HIS 3720 - Topics in Asian History

    3 cr
    This course introduces Asian history by focusing on topics that reflect current events and student interests. Topics will change from year to year, therefore, and may include, for example, the democracy movement in China; Asia through film and fiction; the cultural revolution and beyond; modern Chinese cultural critique; women in Asia, the body in Asia as a site of culture and history; and the struggle for democracy and economic growth in East Asia. This course may be repeated for credit as topics change.
    Periodically
  
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    HIS 3810 - Internship in History

    3 cr
    By arrangement with the coordinator of the history program. See Internships . Signed contract required at time of registration. Variable credit.
  
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    HIS 3910 - Independent Study

    3 cr
    Provides the exceptionally curious and motivated student the opportunity to explore in greater depth an aspect of a history course already taken. Students need to arrange with an appropriate history faculty member a student-faculty independent study contract prior to registration.
  
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    HIS 4601 - History Research Seminar

    3 cr
    This course is required of all students majoring in History or Social Studies. It is the first in a sequence of two required courses leading to the History Thesis (see HIS 4602 ). The goal of the course is to teach students how to approach history from the point of view of a historian, reading texts for historiographical, theoretical and methodological significance. In this class, students learn how to conduct quality research and to develop bibliographic and citation skills. They apply these skills when they identify, locate and analyze secondary and primary sources that lead to a substantial research proposal that will form the basis of the History Thesis.
    Prerequisite: Majoring in History or Social Studies; junior or senior status.
    Fall
  
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    HIS 4602 - History Thesis Seminar

    3 cr
    This capstone seminar is required of all students majoring in History or Social Studies. Building on the research proposal developed in HIS 4601 , students will continue to locate, evaluate and interpret the significance of primary and secondary sources pertaining to a particular historical research project. This course is conducted as a seminar, with emphasis placed on working together with the professor and all class members to prepare a culminating project for public presentation to the campus community, and submitted in written form as a History Thesis.
    Prerequisite:  HIS 4601 
    Spring
  
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    HIS 4910 - Independent Study

    3 cr
    Provides the exceptionally curious and motivated student the opportunity to explore in greater depth any aspect of historical study. The study must culminate in a major research paper based on both primary and secondary sources. Students need to arrange with an appropriate history faculty member a student-faculty independent study contract prior to registration.

Honors

  
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    HON 1010 - First-Year Honors: Great Ideas in the Castleton Curriculum

    3 cr
    As the first course in the university's Honors program, HON 1010 introduces students to some of the most important ideas in the Castleton curriculum--ideas such as the nature of knowledge, the power of art, the relationship between justice and law, theories of space and time, and the goals of feminism.  As they grapple with these issues, students are stimulated to expand the range of subjects in which they are interested and to fashion for themselves an educational program characterized by challenge and exploration.
    Restricted to students in the Honors Scholarship Program.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Fall
  
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    HON 2020 - Special Topics in Honors

    3 cr
    Special Topics in Honors courses are intended to ignite the intellectual curiosity of academically advanced students and challenge them to explore in depth a range of intriguing subjects and perspectives.
    Restricted to Honors Scholarship students and Distinguished Scholars' Certificate students, or instructor permission.

Interdisciplinary Liberal Arts

  
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    INT 1051 - First-Year Soundings I: An Introduction to The Liberal Arts, Part I

    1 cr
    The student experiences the richness and vitality of the liberal arts through lectures, plays, recitals, poetry readings, dance performances, and other campus-sponsored cultural and intellectual activities during the year.  Students are required to attend a minimum of six events during the semester.
    Requires $60 course fee.
    Fall, Spring
  
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    INT 1053 - First Year Soundings II, an Introduction to the Liberal Arts, Part II

    0.5 cr
    A continuation of First-Year Soundings I. Students must attend at least four events during the semester. Both First-Year Soundings I and II must be taken during the student’s first year at Castleton. Consequently, a student may not drop First-Year Soundings unless, in the judgment of the teachers of Soundings, he or she has a very serious reason such as substantial personal hardship or prolonged illness.
    Fee $60.
  
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    INT 1070 - Foundations of Leadership

    3 cr
    Foundations of Leadership helps students to understand, appreciate and reflect on their position in the communities to which they belong, and to learn to foster change in those communities. The course offers a survey of leadership theory and, more prominently, leadership training in the individual, group, and civic skills necessary to develop as leaders capable of significant civic work. The course approaches leadership through an interdisciplinary problem-based method, organizing our discussions and course activities around the students’ development of a community-based, civic-engagement project. Throughout the semester, the students will work in teams to develop projects that will be implemented at the end of the term.
    Fall
  
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    INT 1210 - iSeminar

    1 cr
    This course assists new international students to transition effectively to the U.S. system of higher education. Through discussing both transition issues (such as medical insurance or differences in classroom culture) and students' home cultures, the course provides the opportunity for new international students to strengthen their reading, writing, and participation skills and to form a community with other international students and peer mentors.
    Fall
  
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    INT 2015 - The Collapse of a Civilization

    4 cr
    This interdisciplinary course examines the rise and fall of the Mayan civilization of Central America. We study the environment, history, and science of the Maya, paying particular attention to how they interacted with their natural world. We then travel to the mountains of Belize to explore the setting where the Maya once thrived. Upon our return we process what we have learned with an eye towards understanding contemporary sustainability issues.
    This course fulfills the World Views Frame of Reference.
    Fee: Dependent on current travel costs; approximately $2000.
    Periodically
  
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    INT 2030 - Southwest Exploration

    3 cr
    This experiential learning course is designed to encompass the totality of the student learning experiences for the Semester in the American Southwest.  This learning exploration includes daily experiences of living and learning in the Southwest including classroom instruction related to the required coursework and outside-of-classroom learning experiences including multiple field trips to museums, galleries, pueblos, anthropological sites, camping trips, and explorations in the Southwest.
    Must be taken as part of participation in the Castleton Semester in the Southwest.
    Periodically
  
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    INT 3054 - Junior Soundings

    0.5 cr
    The student experiences the richness and vitality of the liberal arts through lectures, plays, recitals, poetry readings, dance performances, and other campus sponsored cultural and intellectual activities during the year. Students must attend at least three events during the semester. In addition, students will be required to attend an orientation session at the beginning of the semester and write an essay in which they reflect upon their General Education experiences.
    Prerequisite: INT 1051  and  , and junior standing.
    Fee $50.
  
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    INT 3820 - iSeminar Proctorship

    0-1 cr
    Proctors for the iSeminar mentor international students and assume partial responsibility, under faculty supervision, for the progress of students in the iSeminar course. 
    Repeatable for cedit
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission required
    Fall
  
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    INT 4740 - New Student Seminar Practicum

    1 cr
    This course provides an opportunity for students to learn techniques for facilitating small group discussions and practice those skills during orientation and FYS (First-Year Seminar) program.
    This course is repeatable for credit.

Mathematics

  
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    MAT 0190 - Mathematics Skills Lab

    1 cr
    Required of all students whose test scores on ACCUPLACER indicate weakness in basic mathematical skills. The operations of arithmetic and elementary algebra are developed through problems and examples. Credit for this course does not count toward diploma requirements.
    Periodically
  
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    MAT 1010 - Essential Mathematics

    2 cr
    Mathematical analysis and problem solving based on arithmetic and elementary algebra. The course requirements include writing and problem solving assignments. This course may not be used to fulfill the mathematics core requirement.
    Prerequisite: Students must take a math assessment (ACCUPLACER) for placement purposes prior to registration.
  
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    MAT 1221 - Finite Mathematics

    3 cr
    This is an introductory problem-solving course with applications from biology, behavioral science, social science, business and finance. Students examine coordinate systems and graphs, functions, linear programming, matrices and linear systems, game theory, and probability topics.
    This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Prerequisite: Students must take a math assessment (ACCUPLACER) for placement purposes prior to registration or MAT 1010 .
    Every semester
  
  •  

    MAT 1230 - College Algebra

    3 cr
    This course is intended to prepare students for Precalculus by reviewing the fundamental concepts of algebra.  Topics inculde equations and inequalities, exponents, radicals, functions, systems of equations, polynomials and applications.
    This course satisfies the Scientific & Mathematical Understanding frame of reference.
    Every semester
  
  •  

    MAT 1350 - Statistics and Health

    3 cr
    The content in this core course builds on the subject matter from Healthcare Research, Healthcare Literature, and Evidence Based Practice. The focus of this course will be on the development of statistical reasoning and practice analyzing actual data that will expose nursing students to basic calculations of descriptive and inferential statistics using statistical software such as SPSS, Minitab, or R language, these technological and statistical skills are needed to interpret scientific studies and understand the scientific method. Students will also acquire the knowledge and technological skills needed to manipulate quantitative data and use nonparametric and parametric statistics to answer research questions and test hypotheses.
    This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Fall
  
  •  

    MAT 1360 - Precalculus with Applications

    4 cr
    In addition to preparing students for the study of calculus, this course presents a variety of functions that can be used for modeling and solving real-life problems.  Functions are explored from numerical, graphical, and analytic perspectives and include the study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trignometric functions.  Students utilize technology and practice applying concepts in weekly workshops.
    This course satisfies the Scientific & Mathematical Understanding frame of reference.
    Prerequisite: MAT 1230  with a grade of "C" or better, or appropriate placement.
    Every semester
  
  •  

    MAT 1531 - Calculus I

    4 cr
    Topics include limits, differentiation, applications of derivatives, and an introduction to integration.  This course may utilize graphing calculators on a regular basis.
    This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Prerequisite: MAT 1360  or equivalent.
    Every semester
  
  •  

    MAT 2015 - History of Mathematics

    3 cr
    This course studies the development of various branches of mathematics from ancient times to the present, and investigates historical and multicultural influences on the development of mathematics.  Beginning with ancient number systems, we examine major discoveries in mathematics, development of mathematical methods and notation, and individuals having a prominent role in advancing the field of mathematics.  Students conduct research and present their findings as written reports and oral presentations.
    This course satisfies the World Views frame of reference.
    Prerequisite: MAT 1230  
    Spring
  
  •  

    MAT 2021 - Statistics I

    3 cr
    This course prepares students for quantitative methods in their respective fields. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation are covered. Basic tools of descriptive statistics, discrete probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, t-distribution, estimates and sample sizes, hypothesis testing, elementary correlation and regression, contingency tables are explored. Students utilize graphing calculators and spreadsheet software on a regular basis.
    This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Prerequisite: Students must take a math assessment (ACCUPLACER) for placement purposes prior to registration or MAT 1010 .
    Every semester
  
  •  

    MAT 2022 - Statistics II

    3 cr
    This course is a continuation of MAT 2021  and includes estimation, hypothesis testing, single linear regression, and one-way analysis of variance using calculators and statistical software. This course addresses in-depth such topics as the Central Limit Theorem, Chebyshev's theorem, covariance, multiple regression, ANOVA, nonparametric methods, and applications of probability distributions. It includes problems dealing with multiple linear regression, multi-way analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics, enumerative data, and computer applications. Students utilize graphing calculators and spreadsheet software on a regular basis.
    This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Prerequisite: MAT 2021  
    Every semester
  
  •  

    MAT 2036 - Biostatistics

    4 cr
    This course introduces statistical concepts and analytical methods as applied to data encountered in ecological, environmental, and biomedical sciences.  It emphasizes the basic concepts of experimental design, quantitative analysis of data, and statistical inferences.  Topics include probability theory and distributions; population parameters and their sample estimates; descriptive statistics for central tendency and dispersion; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals for means, variances, and proportions; the chi-square statistic; categorical data analysis; linear correlation and regression model; analysis of variance; and nonparametric methods.  The course provides students a foundation to evaluate information critically to support research objectives and product claims and a better understanding of statistical design of experimental trials for biological products/devices.
    Students will be required to have a scientific calculator.
    Prerequisite:
    Minimum math placement of MAT 1320  or MAT 2021  .

  
  •  

    MAT 2532 - Calculus II

    4 cr
    Continuation of Calculus I, with topics to include techniques of integration, applications of integration, improper integrals, sequences, series, and Taylor polynomials.  Students in this course may be required to utilize graphing calculators.
    This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Prerequisite: MAT 1531  
    Every semester
  
  •  

    MAT 2810 - Internship in Mathematics

    1-12 cr
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
  •  

    MAT 2900 - Independent Study

    1-3 cr
    Open on a limited basis. A personal interview with the Mathematics Department faculty is required prior to registration.
    Hours by arrangement.
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
    Prerequisite: Consent of department chair.
  
  •  

    MAT 3020 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers

    4 cr
    This course will focus on achieving goals set forth in Vermont’s Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities and the Standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), while strengthening the mathematical knowledge of the prospective elementary school teacher. Students will be given numerous opportunities to discover and construct important mathematical concepts and techniques using a variety of student-centered learning strategies, including the use of manipulative devices, graphing calculators, computers, Internet, portfolio and journal assessment, and Video Vignettes.
    Every semester
  
  •  

    MAT 3035 - Teaching Mathematics I

    3 cr
    This course is a study of strategies, techniques, materials, technology, and current research used in the teaching of mathematical concepts to elementary and high school students. Students will review the traditional and contemporary standards involved in teaching mathematics at the elementary to secondary school level; develop an awareness of the professional resources, materials, technology and information available for teachers; prepare unit and lesson plans with related assessment procedures on a variety of topics; and acquire teaching experience by taking part in individual tutoring, observation at a school, and/or presenting lessons at the appropriate level. This course fulfills three pedagogy lab credits in secondary mathematics and may be taken as an elective for MDS majors.
    Prerequisite: Math Ed or MDS major, junior or senior status.
    Fall
  
  •  

    MAT 3210 - Linear Algebra

    3 cr
    This course introduces students to linear algebra including a study of vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants, inner products, and characteristic equations. Topics to be studied include mathematical structures, algebraic properties, and applications of matrices, determinants, vectors, vector spaces, and linear transformations. Students develop and solve mathematical models involving systems of linear algebraic equations and systems of linear differential equations. Students utilize graphing calculators and a computer algebra system.
    Prerequisite: MAT 2532 
    Fall
  
  •  

    MAT 3220 - Probability

    3 cr
    This is a calculus-based course introducing probability theory including discrete and continuous random variables and their probability distributions, multivariate probability distributions, functions of random variables, and limit theorems.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3533  
    Fall
  
  •  

    MAT 3230 - Mathematical Statistics

    3 cr
    This calculus-based course is a continuation of MAT 3220  including estimation theory, hypothesis testing, analysis of enumerative data, regression, analysis of variance, and nonparametric statistics.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3220 .
    Spring
  
  •  

    MAT 3250 - Applied Statistics with SPSS

    3 cr
    Methods of analyzing univariate and multivariate data using statistical packages including Minitab, SPSS, and SAS. Topics include descriptive statistics for univariate and bivariate data, basic properties of multivariate distributions, multivariate linear regression, principal component analysis for dimension reduction, factor analysis, canonical correlation analysis, discrimination and classification, and simple multiple series models.
    This course fulfills the Scientific and Mathematical Understanding Frame of Reference.
    Prerequisite: MAT 2022  or MAT 3230 
    Every Semester
  
  •  

    MAT 3310 - Differential Equations

    3 cr
    This course is a study of first and higher order differential equations with many applications to science. Students explore analytical and numerical solution methods for ordinary and partial differential equations including series solutions and special functions for the solution of ODEs and the use of Fourier series to solve PDEs. Laplace transforms and numerical methods for solving ODEs and PDEs are introduced.
    Prerequisite: MAT 2532  and MAT 3210 .
    Spring
  
  •  

    MAT 3410 - Introduction to Mathematical Proofs

    3 cr
    This course is an introduction to mathematical proof and serves as a bridge from elementary courses to more advanced mathematics. Students explore fundamental ideas in logic, sets, the theory of numbers, relations and functions.
    Prerequisite: MAT 1360  
    Fall
  
  •  

    MAT 3533 - Calculus III

    4 cr
    Continuation of Calculus II, with topics including polar, spherical and cylindrical coordinates, partial derivatives, multiple integrals and vector calculus such as line integrals, surface integrals, and Gauss's, Green's, and Stoke's Theorems.  Students in this course may be required to utilize graphing calculators.
    Prerequisite: MAT 2532  
    Spring
  
  •  

    MAT 3810 - Internship in Mathematics

    1-12 cr
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
  •  

    MAT 3820 - Mathematics Tutorship

    1-3 cr
    A supervised experience in individual instruction. To include reading and discussion of individualized instructional systems as well as an actual tutorial experience in MAT 0190  or in a 1000’s or 2000’s level Mathematics course.
    Prerequisite: Invitation of the Mathematics Department.
  
  •  

    MAT 3900 - Independent Study

    1-3 cr
    Open on a limited basis. A personal interview with the Mathematics Department faculty is required prior to registration.
    Hours by arrangement.
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
    Prerequisite: Consent of department chair.
  
  •  

    MAT 3910 - Independent Foreign Study in Mathematics

    Credits to be arranged.
    Registration by permission of department chair only.
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
  
  •  

    MAT 4010 - Design of Experiments

    3 cr
    Analysis of Variance techniques, basic experimental designs, complete and incomplete blocking, and factorial designs.
    Prerequisite: MAT 2022  or MAT 3230 . Marketing Majors should elect this course after BUS 4030 .
    Periodically
  
  •  

    MAT 4020 - Applied Linear Regression

    3 cr
    Linear and multiple regression models. Least squares estimates, correlation, and prediction. Discriminate analysis, factor analysis, and cluster analysis.
    Prerequisite: MAT 1531 , MAT 3250 .
    Periodically
  
  •  

    MAT 4035 - Teaching Mathematics II

    3 cr
    A continuation of MAT 3035  Teaching Mathematics I, this course concentrates on in-depth mathematics instruction, multiple assessment techniques, past and present mathematics standards preparing students to become elementary and secondary mathematics instructors. A strong emphasis is placed on the appropriate usage of technology in mathematics instruction. Students shall construct, revise, and execute lesson and unit plans in mathematics. This course fulfills three pedagogy lab credits in secondary mathematics and may be taken as an elective by MDS majors.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3035  or consent of the instructor
    Spring
  
  •  

    MAT 4040 - Complex Analysis

    3 cr
    This course is an introduction to complex analysis at the undergraduate level.  Complex analysis is the theory of differentiation and integration of functions with complex-valued arguments.  Complex analysis has many applications to engineering, physics and applied mathematics.  Topics include properties of complex numbers, analytic functions, mapping, contour integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, and residue theory.
    Prerequisite: MAT 4110  
    Periodically
  
  •  

    MAT 4110 - Advanced Calculus

    3 cr
    This course is devoted to rigorous presentation of the basics of mathematical analysis of real valued functions of one (real) variable from the standpoint of contemporary/modern mathematics.  It is a natural continuation of the sequence of calculus courses and will give proofs of important theorems used in those courses.  Emphasis will be on the concepts and theoretical approach to calculus.  Topics to be covered include theory of the real number system, theory of sequences and series of real numbers, theory of continuity, differentiability of real-valued functions, and theory of the Riemann integral of real valued functions.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3533  and MAT 3410 .
    Fall
  
  •  

    MAT 4120 - Numerical Analysis

    3 cr
    Numerical computation techniques for solving non-linear and transcendental equations including Newton’s method, bisection method, and secant method. Numerical solutions to polynomials, including synthetic division. Numerical interpolation, approximation, integration, and numerical solutions to ordinary differential equations.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3210 , MAT 3310  or consent of instructor.
    Periodically Offered on a limited basis in consultation with the department chair
  
  •  

    MAT 4130 - Abstract Algebra

    3 cr
    This course is an introduction to the principles and concepts of modern abstract algebra. Topics will include groups, rings, and fields with applications to number theory, the theory of equations, and geometry.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3210  and MAT 3410 , or consent of instructor.
    Spring
  
  •  

    MAT 4140 - Geometry

    3 cr
    This course includes a review of Euclidean geometry and an introduction to non-Euclidean geometries including finite geometries and systems of axioms, classical theorems and elementary transformations.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3410  .
    Spring
  
  •  

    MAT 4210 - Teachers as Researchers

    2 cr
    This course is intended for pre-service teachers who are seeking to increase their understanding of mathematics. The course uses data collection and analysis to guide improvement in K-6 mathematics programs. The student will build on the knowledge gained in MAT 3020  to obtain a deeper understanding of mathematics as related to NCTM and the Vermont Framework guidelines. In this course, students will function as researchers by gathering data and analyzing data, as means of improving the curriculum and instruction in K-6 mathematics programs. As researchers, students are encouraged to ask questions, pose problems, and identify means of solving problems by using different strategies. Emphasis will be on student-centered instructional approach, with ample use of manipulatives and technology.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3020  or consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    MAT 4710 - Topics in Mathematics

    1-3 cr
    Advanced topics in mathematics offered on a rotating basis. Examples of topics include: complex analysis, topology, Galois theory, number theory.
    Prerequisite: MAT 3533 , MAT 3410 , or consent of the instructor.
    Fall
  
  •  

    MAT 4720 - Senior Seminar

    3 cr
    An undergraduate research seminar. Students spend the first half of the semester studying and presenting undergraduate research in mathematics. In the second half, students investigate their own topic, prepare a written report, and present their research.
    Prerequisite: Math major, senior standing, or consent of the instructor.
    Fall
  
  •  

    MAT 4810 - Internship in Mathematics

    1-12 cr
    Signed contract required at time of registration.
 

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